New Chapbook Out Now

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Out now from Analog Submission Press is my newest chapbook, Subliminal Syntax. Handmade and limited to 25 copies, the publisher describes it as “an 18 page feast of cut-up prose and syntactical deconstruction.”

This is my first chapbook in quite sometime and I’m very proud of it! I hope you’ll pick up a copy today!

 

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New Chap coming In The New Year

While I’ve been lying low and generally being apathetic, time has simply flown by. I’m realizing that my last chapbook released online was 2013… and my last actual print chapbook was way back in 2009! Luckily, it seems my decade of apathy is coming to a close. My next chapbook, Subliminal Syntax is due for a February release from Analog Submission Press.

Feels good to be back in my old skin. Here’s to a productive 2019!

Back From The Dead, Briefly (Probably)

I haven’t updated this blog all year… better late than never I suppose. At any rate, after a slow year I am proud to say that my poems Wide Infinity Lines and Found Language, Buddha In Color are up over at the excellent Why Vandalism? I hope you’ll give them a read!

2 Poems At Rusty Truck

I’m proud to announce that I have two poems, 3am Soundtracks and Thinking About Philip Levine are up over at the always stellar Rusty Truck. Poems about factories are hard to get of your system, when you can’t escape from the system, but misery always makes for a worthy muse.

A Tribute To Buk

The first print run of Sunny Side Down: A Charles Bukowski Tribute from Patchouli Press has already been released and sold out within a mere few days. However, there will be a second and last pressing, so contact Patchouli Press to reserve your copy now!

My poem “Any Damn Fool Can Go To Work Everyday” was lucky enough to be featured along with work from Rob Plath, Justin Hyde, Joseph Ridgewell, and many others!

Is Traditional Publishing A Black Hole?

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I didn’t write that.

I found this graphic somewhere or another on the internet when I should have been writing or working instead. It stuck with me, and while I may not agree or disagree with it, it proposes serious questions.

Is traditional publishing a black hole?

In 2017, is there still a stigma against self-publishing?

As with most topics, it depends on whom you ask. I’ve never had a problem with it; in fact, out of my six chapbooks two were self-produced. There is a lot of bad self-published work out there, but there is a lot of bad writing put out by major publishers as well.

However, I would hesitate to call out editors as elitist with asinine egos. Firstly, that is not fair. Secondly, I’ve been on that side of the desk and can assure you that editors are not out to destroy the dreams of their writers… that would be rather counterproductive, don’t you think? I would also hesitate to call these small magazines pathetic. The small press has been very kind to me, and while I am far from famous, the only reason anyone knows who in the hell I am, is because of the small press magazines/presses which found some sort of value in my work.

I don’t have a problem with the publishing game. I don’t have a problem with the hustle, the research or submission process. I don’t even have a problem with the rejections. It’s all part of this writers life we committed to.

For me personally, the problem is a lack of truly experimental presses. To make it worse, out of the handful of experimental publishers I find, most of them do not accept unsolicited submissions, or are closed to submissions entirely. I’ve been sitting on two manuscripts for quite some time, submitting them when I finally find an appropriate publisher… obviously that has not been fruitful. It’s frustrating. Because of this, self-publishing has an appeal.

Does it matter how these manuscripts find their way into the world? I’m not going to become rich and famous writing experimental texts. The type of people who would look down at my writing because it is self-published, would likely look down on it even if it was published by Penguin.

Ironically, I have self-produced noise/sound art for many years, as have most of my contemporaries. In the music world, D.I.Y. art is not looked down upon, but celebrated. Why the difference between the music world and the literary world, are we as writers that pretentious and self- important?

So what do you think?